Ireland in the Fixties ~ Sounds
.
.

The portable record-player, with auto-changer could play up to ten 7" records (singles and/or E.P.s) in succession. For bands and groups, please see our showbands and beat-groups archive. Here we will focus on some records, radio-programmes and music-papers from the Fixties. L.P.s and E.P.s came in strong, glossy card covers while singles usually came in cheap paper bags with the record-label logo. In countries such as Sweden, Germany and Netherlands, singles came in picture-sleeves.

.
 

Pop Weekly was an A4 glossy which sold well in the late '50s and early '60s. Not as heavy as Melody Maker and NME, yet more serious than Fabulous and Jackie.

.
.. ..

We tuned in to Radio Luxembourg to hear the latest pop hits. Barry Aldis and Stuart Henry were two of their top presenters. Both are now deceased.

.
.
"Hello, friends this is Horace Batchelor, the inventor of the fabulous Infra-Draw system. You too can start to win really worthwhile dividends using my method." Keynsham, a little town near Bristol became a familiar household name to millions of Radio Luxembourg listeners across Europe in the 1950s and 1960s thanks to a local betting expert. Self-styled "football pools king" Horace Batchelor, in his Radio Luxembourg Infra-Draw ad would spell out, "that's K-E-Y-N-S-H-A-M". Customers followed his unique "infra draw" tip system, which forecast which matches would be drawn in the pools. He put the otherwise little-known town on the map by spelling out its name letter by letter so listeners would address their applications correctly when ordering tips by post.
. ...  
 
   
 
The RTV Guide listed television and radio schedules . . .
   
 
   
 
. . . its Northern Ireland counterpart was the TV Post.
.    
 

Shopping | Home | Fashion | Books | Pastimes | School | Films | Sounds | Toys | Transport | People | Collecting | Advertising | Showbands | Beat-Groups

francis k. 2008